Is PAIN a good thing or a bad thing?

A common question we ask practice members is, “if I could give you something that was natural, had no side effects, was inexpensive, you only had to take it once and you would never feel pain again, would you want it?” Almost always, the answer is a resounding, “YES.”

But, the people who answer, “yes” do not understand the purpose that pain serves in the human body. According to most physiology textbooks, the purpose of pain is to serve as a protective mechanism for the body-it occurs whenever there are tissues that are being damaged.

So, if you broke your leg but couldn’t feel the pain and continued to try to walk or run on that leg, would that be a good thing or a bad thing? If you put your hand on a hot stove but, because you couldn’t feel the pain, didn’t immediately remove it, would that be a good thing or a bad thing? So, is the presence of pain the problem or is the presence of pain a signal that there is a problem?

Obviously, pain is a signal that there is a problem somewhere in the body. So, why would people spend in the billions of dollars every year to try and keep pain at bay? Especially, when killing the pain may be making you more comfortable while a severe health problem develops. Because we have been conditioned by our doctors, the media and the drug companies to seek relief rather than seek the underlying cause of health problems.

Are we suggesting that you should suffer when in pain? Of course not. We’re suggesting that if you HAVE TO take something for pain, make sure you use that drug to buy you the time needed to find the cause of the problem and get it handled. Unfortunately, most people become chronic abusers of pain medication and act as if the pain is the problem rather than simply a symptom that something has gone wrong in the body.

Instead of covering up pain, schedule an appointment at our office today to get to the underlying cause of the problem.

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